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palabra asturiana más guapa / most beautiful Asturian word
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Álvaro



Joined: 23 Nov 2008
Posts: 4
Location: Madrid

PostPosted: Sun Nov 23, 2008 7:13 am    Post subject: afayaízu Reply with quote

Terechu wrote:
Voy a intentarlo yo, César.

Afayaízu: (de afayáse = hallarse agusto)
Esto en inglés sería una combinación de "comfortable" y "cozy", o como dirían los niños "comfy-cozy".

Prestoso: (prestar = dar de sí, prestancia = excelencia)
Antiguamente se diría "delightful", pero el equivalente moderno es sin duda "cool". Laughing


Si tenemos en cuenta que l'Academia de la Llingua Asturiana lleva pocu tiempu y l'asturianu permuncho ye normal que se fale distintu en sitios distintos (tres o treinta, cada valle el suyu). Pero les variaciones recoxíes nel Diccionariu Básicu de la Llingua Asturiana contempla tamién afayadiegu.

Na mio humilde opinión diría o bien CUTU que ye fríu o AFORFUGARSE que quier dicir cansase por facer un trabayu con munchu apuru
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Marta Elena Díaz García
Moderator


Joined: 07 Sep 2003
Posts: 359
Location: Molleda. Corvera de Asturias

PostPosted: Fri May 29, 2009 10:12 am    Post subject: Caxigalines Reply with quote

Hi,

What do you think about "CAXIGALINES".... Very Happy
Is it or not a very nice word? It is another "musical word"...

Caxigalines means: trifle, something of little importance or value Rolling Eyes Mr. Green

-------------------------------------------------------------
¿Qué os parece "CAXIGALINES" ... Very Happy
¿Es o no una palabra guapa? Para mi es otra palabra con música

Caxigalines: bagatelas, menudencias Rolling Eyes Mr. Green
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Art
Site Admin


Joined: 17 Feb 2003
Posts: 4467
Location: Maryland

PostPosted: Thu Jul 02, 2009 2:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Does caxigalines literally mean something like "box of chickens"?

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¿Significa caxigalines palabra por palabra "caja de gallinas"?
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Bob
Moderator


Joined: 24 Feb 2003
Posts: 1724
Location: Connecticut and Massachusetts

PostPosted: Thu Jul 02, 2009 2:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I like the sound of it. Personally, however, I favor "xana," but my knowledge of asturianu leaves much to be desired.

I think one of the best sounding words in English is "silver" (plata), a word that oddly enough has no rhyme I can think of.

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Trans. Ana

Me gusta cómo suena. No obstante, personalmente, sigo votando por "xana", pero mi conocimiento del asturiano deja mucho que desear.

En mi opinión una de las mejores palabras en inglḉes en cuanto a sonoridad es "silver" (plata), una palabra que, curiosamente, no tiene otra con la que rime.
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Marta Elena Díaz García
Moderator


Joined: 07 Sep 2003
Posts: 359
Location: Molleda. Corvera de Asturias

PostPosted: Thu Jul 02, 2009 9:51 am    Post subject: Funny.... Reply with quote

Dear Art, dear Bob: Very Happy

It was very funny that the word "caxigalines" remember you a "caxa de gallines".....

I don´t know exactly the origin of the word. I was looking for a word equivalent in Spanish and the word "cajigal" (or "quejigal") may be a possibility. Shocked

Cajigal means a field planted with "cajigos" (or "quejigos") that are trees such as holm oaks, oaks, etc. These trees give acorns. I suppose that in bable those cajigos and, particularly their fruits, could be named as "caxigos".....and from this we have "caxigalines":

Cajigos------> caxigos-------> caxigalines. Shocked Rolling Eyes Shocked

This is my theory.....I suppose in the forum there are persons with a deeper knowledge of the ethimological origin of this word. Wink

Xana is also a nice word.

What do you think about "paxello"? Cool
Marta

--------------------------------------------------------------------------

Trans. Ana

Queridos Art y Bob: Very Happy

Me ha hecho mucha gracia que la palabra “caxigalines” os recuerde a “una caja de gallinas”....

Desconozco el origen exacto de la palabra. He buscado un equivalente en español y la palabra “cajigal” (o “quejigal”) podría ser una posibilidad Shocked

Cajigal significa campo plantado con “cajigos” (o “quejigos”), que son unos árboles como las encinas, los robles, etc. Estos árboles dan bellotas. Supongo que en bable estos cajigos y, especialmente sus frutos, podrían llamarse “caxigos”... y de ahí “caxigalines”.

Cajigos------> caxigos-------> caxigalines. Shocked Rolling Eyes Shocked

Esta es mi teoría.... Supongo que en el foro haya personas con un conocimiento más exhaustivo del origen etimológico de esta palabra. Wink

Xana también es una palabra bonita.

¿Qué me decís de “paxello”? Cool
Marta
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Marta Elena Díaz García
Moderator


Joined: 07 Sep 2003
Posts: 359
Location: Molleda. Corvera de Asturias

PostPosted: Thu Jul 02, 2009 10:00 am    Post subject: Silver rhymes with... Reply with quote

Hello Bob:

I don't know the rules for rhymes in English, but.....can silver rhyme with river? Rolling Eyes
Marta Very Happy

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Trans. Ana

Hola Bob:

No conozco las reglas para las rimas en inglés, pero.... ¿podría silver rimar con river? Rolling Eyes

Marta Very Happy
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Bob
Moderator


Joined: 24 Feb 2003
Posts: 1724
Location: Connecticut and Massachusetts

PostPosted: Thu Jul 02, 2009 10:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I like the sound of paxellu (some kind of basket?).

As to "silver," I was thinking of what is sometimes called feminine rhyme, where the last two syllables rhyme (where the second is unstressed). I don't think there is another English word pronounced with the "ilver" sound from silver. Masculine rhymes match only the last (stressed) syllable.

Another word without a feminine rhyme in English is "orange," although some people have suggested "door hinge." The sound is not really the same, however, since the "h" in hinge is pronounced in American English (it would rhyme for Cockneys).

I write fiction and poetry, and use no rhymes (just rhythm and meter and assonance) in my poetry. Here's one little excerpt:

For others, stars and moon loom dark and black,
Chilling night mists, filled with ashes, dead men's fingers,
All cold and breathless terrors,
While we and we alone, ablaze, fear not,
And drink the living silver of the night
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Marta Elena Díaz García
Moderator


Joined: 07 Sep 2003
Posts: 359
Location: Molleda. Corvera de Asturias

PostPosted: Thu Jul 02, 2009 11:17 am    Post subject: Silver.... Reply with quote

Hi, Bob, Very Happy

....and what about "sliver" (same letters, different order)....

Your poem is wonderful..... Very Happy

"Para los otros, estrellas y luna, amenazante oscuridad y negrura.
Niebla nocturna aterradora, de cenizas, dedos amenazantes de muertos,
Frío, terrores irrespirables.
Mientras que nosotros, nosotros solos, en llamas, sin miedo,
bebemos la luz viva, de plata, de la noche...."

I like it, even after my translation Confused .....

Marta
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Bob
Moderator


Joined: 24 Feb 2003
Posts: 1724
Location: Connecticut and Massachusetts

PostPosted: Thu Jul 02, 2009 11:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

No, sliver and silver don't rhyme. It needs the "il" sound.

I'm pleased that you enjoyed the poem stanza, and I do like your translation. It's a piece of a series of poems I wrote for my wife, Evelyn, twelve years ago. I had been writing fiction for a while, but never poetry, until I notice a highway marker that read "Ruby Road," and immediately thought "more precious than rubies, glistering and darker than blood," and composed most of the poem in my mind during the rest of the drive home. This somehow led to a poem for each month of the year.

I've read some of my short stories, which are based on Asturian themes and characters, at several meetings of the Society for Literature, Science and the Arts, and will probably do so again in November. I'm currently looking for a publisher.

I'm a biology professor, and most of my colleagues donlt quite understand why I write instead of doing lab research. The simplest answer is that it is much more enjoyable and creative.
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Bob
Moderator


Joined: 24 Feb 2003
Posts: 1724
Location: Connecticut and Massachusetts

PostPosted: Sat Jul 25, 2009 8:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Caxigalines

http://mas.lne.es/diccionario/index.php?palabra=caxigalina&buscarter=on&buscardesc=on
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Art
Site Admin


Joined: 17 Feb 2003
Posts: 4467
Location: Maryland

PostPosted: Mon Jul 27, 2009 3:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks Bob! I never noticed before that the Diccionario General de la Lengua Asturiana (DGLA) doesn´t give word origins. There´s an opportunity!

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¡Gracias Bob! Nunca noté de que el Diccionario General de la Lengua Asturiana (DGLA) no da los orígenes de palabras. ¡Hay una oportunidad!
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Camandula



Joined: 11 Aug 2009
Posts: 7
Location: Aviles, Spain

PostPosted: Tue Aug 11, 2009 11:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Fañagüetu es una palabra que siempre me pareció divertida, más por su sonoridad que por su significado... Wink

Se usa sobre todo para denomimnar el aparato genital femenino.
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Jesus_Aviles



Joined: 12 Jul 2010
Posts: 11

PostPosted: Sun Jul 18, 2010 10:52 am    Post subject: Palabra favorita - Favourite word Reply with quote

The one I love the best is "Rebelgos"
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Art
Site Admin


Joined: 17 Feb 2003
Posts: 4467
Location: Maryland

PostPosted: Sun Jul 18, 2010 3:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Does "rebelgos" mean "tickle"?

It appears that "fañagüetu" has several meanings. Here´s the definition from the DGLA (Diccionario General de la Lengua Asturiana):
http://mas.lne.es/diccionario/index.php?palabra=Fa%F1ag%FCetu&buscarter=on&buscardesc=on
Quote:
fañagüetu, a, o*.
<fañagüetu [Bi. Ca. Ac. Pr]. +fanagüitu / fanagüeta / fanagüeto [Ri].>

1. Poco seria (una persona) [Ac. Pr]. Poco seria, sin sentido ni formalidad (una persona) [Ri]. 2. De poca entidad (un niño) [Bi]. 3. Mal vestido (un niño, no el adulto) [Ca].

fañagüetu, el.
<fañagüeto [Cñ]. +fanagüitu [Ri].>

1. Mazorca pequeña destinada al ganado [Bi (= taguyu)]. 2. Cualquier planta perjudicial para los sembrados [Pr]. 3. Órgano sexual femenino [Ri]. Aparato genital femenino [Cñ (= fandango)].

-----------------------

¿Significa "rebelgos" "cosquilla"?

Parece que "fañagüetu" tiene algunos sentidos. Aquí está la definición del DGLA (Diccionario General de la Lengua Asturiana):
http://mas.lne.es/diccionario/index.php?palabra=Fa%F1ag%FCetu&buscarter=on&buscardesc=on
Quote:
fañagüetu, a, o*.
<fañagüetu [Bi. Ca. Ac. Pr]. +fanagüitu / fanagüeta / fanagüeto [Ri].>

1. Poco seria (una persona) [Ac. Pr]. Poco seria, sin sentido ni formalidad (una persona) [Ri]. 2. De poca entidad (un niño) [Bi]. 3. Mal vestido (un niño, no el adulto) [Ca].

fañagüetu, el.
<fañagüeto [Cñ]. +fanagüitu [Ri].>

1. Mazorca pequeña destinada al ganado [Bi (= taguyu)]. 2. Cualquier planta perjudicial para los sembrados [Pr]. 3. Órgano sexual femenino [Ri]. Aparato genital femenino [Cñ (= fandango)].
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Jesus_Aviles



Joined: 12 Jul 2010
Posts: 11

PostPosted: Sun Jul 18, 2010 5:42 pm    Post subject: Rebelgos Reply with quote

Rebelgos = Cosquillas = Tickles
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