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Spanish Sausage - Chorizo
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Eric Smith Fernandez



Joined: 16 Sep 2004
Posts: 117
Location: Granite City Illinois

PostPosted: Sat Dec 08, 2007 3:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks again, Bob. Sorry about the spelling and typing errors earlier.
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Eric Smith Fernandez



Joined: 16 Sep 2004
Posts: 117
Location: Granite City Illinois

PostPosted: Mon Feb 04, 2008 2:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Art & Bob,

I now have a Luhr Jenson smoker and a meatgrinder with a stuffer attachment. As soon as I "cure" the smoker and get a free weekend, I'll let you know how the chorizo turns out.

Eric
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Art
Site Admin


Joined: 17 Feb 2003
Posts: 4471
Location: Maryland

PostPosted: Tue Feb 05, 2008 12:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Let's see. Illinois... we'll have to plan a road trip for chorizo!

Seriously, Eric, let us know how it goes. I'm still trying to get any family member to make them with me.

----------------------

A ver. Illinois... ¡Tenemos que planear una viaje para chorizo!

Seriamente, Eric, dinos como va. Todavía no tengo éxito en enlistar otro familiar hacerlos conmigo.
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Eric Smith Fernandez



Joined: 16 Sep 2004
Posts: 117
Location: Granite City Illinois

PostPosted: Mon Feb 11, 2008 3:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I cured my smoker, and smoked some steaks to make beef tenderloin asturias a recipe i found on: www.allrecipes.com

The smoker worked great! I might add i bought the Big Chief, which will hold 50 lbs of meat. I can't wait to make chorizo!

Eric

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Curé el fumador, y hice algunos bifteques para hacer "beef tenderloin asturias" una receta que encontré en el sitio de la red: www.allrecipes.com

¡El fumador funcionó muy bien! Para decir más, "Compré el fumador "Big Chief", cual coje 50 libras de la carne. ¡No puedo esperar de hacer chorizu!

Eric
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Bob
Moderator


Joined: 24 Feb 2003
Posts: 1725
Location: Connecticut and Massachusetts

PostPosted: Mon Feb 11, 2008 4:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Be careful - making your own chorizos caseros asturianos can be addictive.
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Joe Junior Garcia



Joined: 17 Feb 2008
Posts: 6
Location: Boca Raton, Florida

PostPosted: Sat Feb 23, 2008 5:04 pm    Post subject: meats Reply with quote

Where can I get Longanetha in South Florida ??? Confused
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Bob
Moderator


Joined: 24 Feb 2003
Posts: 1725
Location: Connecticut and Massachusetts

PostPosted: Sat Feb 23, 2008 5:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm in New England, so I don't know, but you could try contacting someone in the centro asturiano de Miami for advice. The best solution, in my opinion however, is to make your own. Just use the chorizo recipe on this website but don't twist off individual links. Using the smoked paprika from Spain makes a big difference.

La Tienda can provide you with chorizo and morcilla.

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Art
Site Admin


Joined: 17 Feb 2003
Posts: 4471
Location: Maryland

PostPosted: Mon Feb 25, 2008 3:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bob wrote:
... use the chorizo recipe on this website but don't twist off individual links.

Bob, why do you say that? Do you make very long chorizos? Maybe I misunderstood.

------------------------

Bob wrote:
[trans. Art] ... utiliza la receta para chorizo en esta página web, pero no hagas eslabones [trozos en un cadena de chorizo] separados.

¿Bob, porqué dices así? ¿Haces chorizos muy largos? Tal vez no te entiendo.
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Bob
Moderator


Joined: 24 Feb 2003
Posts: 1725
Location: Connecticut and Massachusetts

PostPosted: Mon Feb 25, 2008 7:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

My grandparents called the individual smoked links chorizos. If they made a long rope without individual links (which they did not smoke) they called it longaniza.
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Art
Site Admin


Joined: 17 Feb 2003
Posts: 4471
Location: Maryland

PostPosted: Mon Feb 25, 2008 10:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks, Bob; that's interesting. Did your grandparents use the chorizo and longaniza for different things? How long was your grandparents' longaniza? (That's *not* a joke!)

Earlier Mafalda, a great source of interesting information, mentioned that there is an unspiced "longaniza de Avilés" which is different from the usual longaniza. She also says that longaniza is usually about 30 cm (1 foot) long.

(Bob's grandparents apparently made the usual kind of longaniza, not longaniza de Avilés.)

http://www.asturianus.org/forum/viewtopic.php?p=5628#5628

Actually, the entire thread is worth reading (unless you're trying to avoid feeling hungry):
http://www.asturianus.org/forum/viewtopic.php?t=227

Thanks, too, to Leto who translated almost the entire thread.

-------------------

Gracias, Bob, eso es interesante. ¿Tus abuelos utilizaba para diferentes cosas el chorizo y la longaniza? ¿Qué longitud tenía la longaniza de tus abuelos? (¡No lo digo en broma!)

Antes Mafalda, una gran fuente de información interesante, mencionó que hay una "longaniza de Avilés" sin especia, que es diferente de la longaniza común. También dice que la longaniza normalmente está alrededor de 30 cm (1 pie) de largo.
http://www.asturianus.org/forum/viewtopic.php?p=5628#5628

(Los abuelos de Bob al parecer hicieron la clase de longaniza normal, no la longaniza de Avilés.)

En realidad, todo ese hilo merece la pena leer (a menos que esté tratando de evitar la sensación de hambre):
http://www.asturianus.org/forum/viewtopic.php?t=227

Gracias, también, a Leto, que tradujo casi todo el hilo.
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Bob
Moderator


Joined: 24 Feb 2003
Posts: 1725
Location: Connecticut and Massachusetts

PostPosted: Tue Feb 26, 2008 11:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

My memory of the longaniza is fuzzy over the years. I think it was the same pork, garlic, salt and spice mixture that they used for chorizos, but I don't remember how theyr used it.

The chorizo meat mixture, but the way, is also good formed into patties and fried until a little crisp on the outside. Fry eggs in the grease. and serve with crusty bread.
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Barbara Alonso Novellino



Joined: 22 Oct 2003
Posts: 324
Location: Long Island, New York

PostPosted: Tue Feb 26, 2008 11:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bob,

What a blast from the past...I always loved my chorizos and eggs. But, unfortunately the old cholesterol doesn't like it...but once in awhile...Yum

Barbara
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Bob
Moderator


Joined: 24 Feb 2003
Posts: 1725
Location: Connecticut and Massachusetts

PostPosted: Tue Feb 26, 2008 1:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

There is good news and bad news, as the saying goes. The bad news is that we are all going to die. The good news is that we are all going to die anyway, not matter what we do to prevent it. This leaves many opportunities for enjoying food and other aspects of life. Cholesterol be damned. Life is not risk free. Our grandparents didn't eat chorizos every day, and neither do we, so I just don't worry about it.
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granda



Joined: 24 Sep 2007
Posts: 103

PostPosted: Wed Feb 27, 2008 4:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

BOB worote
[quote]The chorizo meat mixture, but the way, is also good formed into patties and fried until a little crip on the outside. Fry eggs in the grease. and serve with crusty bread.

The above dish with some fries added, is also known in some areas as the peasant dish." (plato del aldeano

One variation is to use hot picadillo (dont know how to translate it, it is like grinded chorizo) instead of chorizo....yummy
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Bob
Moderator


Joined: 24 Feb 2003
Posts: 1725
Location: Connecticut and Massachusetts

PostPosted: Wed Feb 27, 2008 8:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Granda, I think you may be talking about the meat, salt, garlic and spice mixture that is stuffed into casings to make chorizo. We always fry some as patties as "quality control" (have to see if the amount of spices is OK), and then fry eggs in the grease. If we run out of casings we make patties with the remaining meat mixture and freeze them for future use.
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