FAQFAQ          SearchSearch          MemberlistMemberlist          UsergroupsUsergroups    RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile          Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages          Log inLog in          
Las Escuelas del Ave Maria de Arnao
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Asturian-American Migration Forum Index -> Our Photo Album - Nuestro álbum de fotos
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Bob
Moderator


Joined: 24 Feb 2003
Posts: 1707
Location: Connecticut and Massachusetts

PostPosted: Mon Feb 25, 2008 8:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

"Fundamentals" come from a pre-WWI set of publications called "The Fundamentals," which attempted to codify Protestant orthodoxy.

One of the biggest problems I have in helping my students write better is to divest them of the notion that dictionaries authoratively define word meanings. What English dictionaries really do is to describe word usage, including common meanings. The other big problems are grammar (for example, that there is a subjunctive in English) and chosing the best word to convey an idea.

Imprecision in the use of certain words is widespread. One of our deans circulated an email message to his faculty last week that misused "effect" for "affect." Native speakers (and he is one) should not have to rely on a dictionary to know that the two words are entirely separate.
Back to top  
Art
Site Admin


Joined: 17 Feb 2003
Posts: 4430
Location: Maryland

PostPosted: Mon Feb 25, 2008 11:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

granda wrote:
What I have found in UK (don't know in US) is when I make a grammatical/ syntax mistake I am never corrected. ....

Ah, yes, that's the same experience! It's a striking difference.

That's also a funny story about your French friend, Granda. Perhaps as a fellow language learner he understands the need better.

Last week a friend here told me that people in England had corrected his American usage (when it differed from British usage). That makes me wonder if these corrections often carry indirect content (meaning). Perhaps we use correction as a means of establishing dominance or relative prestige. I've noticed that some American academics correct me in a way that gives the strong impression that they are assert superiority (and thus my inferiority).

That reminds me of another example from my days as a graduate student at Dartmouth College. One of my strongest memories comes from the colloquia (academic events in which a specialist gives a talk and then answers questions). The questions from the audience were brutal. We were mercilessly cruel toward guest speakers.

Of course, all of this indicates that language correction does occur among English speakers, perhaps especially among intellectuals. And I'm sure I've done it. Embarassed

--------------------------------

granda wrote:
Lo que siempre he encontrado en Inglaterra (no se en USA) es que cuando cometo un error gramatical/ de sintaxis nunca soy corregido. ....

Ah, sí, eso es la misma experiencia! Es una notable diferencia.

Además, eso es una divertida historia sobre su amigo francés, Granda. Tal vez siendo también un estudiante de idiomas, él comprenda mejor la necesidad.

La semana pasada un amigo me dijo que la gente en Inglaterra había corregido su uso americana (cuando era diferente de el uso británica). Esto me hace preguntarme si estas correcciones llevan a menudo contenido (significado) indirecta. Tal vez usamos corrección como un medio de establecer dominación o prestigio relativo. Me he dado cuenta de que algunos académicos americanos me corrigen en una manera que da la impresión fuerte de que se afirman su superioridad (y por lo tanto mi inferioridad).

Eso me recuerda a otro ejemplo de mis días como estudiante posgrado en Dartmouth College. Uno de mis recuerdos más fuertes proviene de los coloquios (actos académicos en que un especialista ofrece una charla y, a continuación, responde a preguntas). Las preguntas de la audiencia fueron brutales. Estábamos despiadadamente cruel hacia los oradores invitados.

Por supuesto, todo esto indica que, sí, la corrección del uso de la lengua ocurre entre anglo-parlantes, tal vez especialmente entre intelectuales. Y estoy cierto de que lo he hecho. Embarassed
Back to top  
Art
Site Admin


Joined: 17 Feb 2003
Posts: 4430
Location: Maryland

PostPosted: Mon Feb 25, 2008 11:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bob wrote:
.... One of the biggest problems I have in helping my students write better is to divest them of the notion that dictionaries authoritatively define word meanings. What English dictionaries really do is to describe word usage, including common meanings. ....

That's another interesting idea, Bob. What is the result of students viewing dictionaries as containing authoritative definitions?

-----------------------

Bob wrote:
[trans. Art] .... Uno de los problemas más grandes que tengo en ayudar a mis estudiantes escribir mejor es privarlos de la noción que los diccionarios definen con autoridad los significados de palabras. Lo que realmente hacen los diccionarios ingleses es describir los usos de palabras, incluyendo significados comunes. ....

Es otra idea interesante, Bob. ¿Cuál es el resultado cuando los estudiantes creen que los diccionarios contienen definiciones definitivas?
Back to top  
Bob
Moderator


Joined: 24 Feb 2003
Posts: 1707
Location: Connecticut and Massachusetts

PostPosted: Tue Feb 26, 2008 11:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The major result is padded term papers (copying a definition can usually aount to half a page) and a sort of intellectual stultification, an unwillingness to analyze and think independently, and an overreliance on pereived authority. It may be suitable on a middle school level, but it is certainly inappropriate for university classes (especially mine).

On the other hand, dictionaries can be useful in beginning to understand the possible semantic range of a word, but are almost always out of date. If you had looked up "spam" in a 25 year old dictionary, would it have any reference at all to the old Monty Python routine or the extension of the word to mean unwanted email or the sending of unwanted email? And dictionaries are often censored rather heavily (usually by their own editors), leaving out the classic "four letter words" and other terms considered impolite or politically incorrect.
Back to top  
granda



Joined: 24 Sep 2007
Posts: 103

PostPosted: Wed Feb 27, 2008 4:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bod said
Quote:
imprecision in the use of certain words is widespread. One of our deans circulated an email message to his faculty last week that misused "effect" for "affect." Native speakers (and he is one) should not have to rely on a dictionary to know that the two words are entirely separate.


Bob, Could the above just be an spelling mistake?
I remember once in a report from an English Native Speaker that he wrote "the customer would bye" instead of "would buy" This type of mistakes are not possible in Spanish as we write the words the same way that we pronunce them. (I dont know in Asturiano) Of course there are excepcions like the use of b or v.

Talking about spelling, have you see the documentary spellbound? http:// www.imdb.com/title/tt0334405/ It was even nominated for the Oscars as the best documentary in 2003.

Regarding effect and affect, if you like playing billard, I have to recommend you the following book http://www.agapea.com/BILLAR-CON-EFECTO-Y-CON-AFECTO-n155259i.htm.
It is a play of words between efecto = the way you hit the a billard ball with the cue and afecto = Affection

Bob wrote:
On the other hand, dictionaries can be useful in beginning to understand the possible semantic range of a word, but are almost always out of date. If you had looked up "spam" in a 25 year old dictionary, would it have any reference at all to the old Monty Python routine or the extension of the word to mean unwanted email or the sending of unwanted email? And dictionaries are often censored rather heavily (usually by their own editors), leaving out the classic "four letter words" and other terms considered impolite or politically incorrect.


You are right, dictionaries are always out of date, but this is normal as they can only reflect words that are consolidated by the users of that particular languague. The problem is that the moment that the word is compiled there is usually another world or synonime already in place.
Some new words become fashionable and are used for certain period of time, and then suddenly disappear.

Regarding the four letter worlds and the Censorship. When I was a kind we used to play with the dictionary trying to find different ways of saying the same word and the meaning of the same. Oh boy, we were naughty Twisted Evil

Spam..... http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=anwy2MPT5RE Has anyone ever tried Spam? It is totally unknown in Asturias, Wink
Back to top  
Mafalda



Joined: 04 Nov 2005
Posts: 257
Location: España

PostPosted: Sat Mar 01, 2008 5:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

¡Ala!, todo el mundo escribiendo en inglés!!! Twisted Evil, bueno, menos Art, realmente te agradezco que hagas siempre el esfuerzo que supone traducir tus mensajes.

Art dijo:
Quote:
Creo que en los EE.UU. somos más flexibles o liberales en el uso creativo de la lengua que en España. No tenemos una academia de nuestra lengua y no la querríamos. Inventamos palabras, usamos viejas palabras para nuevos usos, y combinamos palabras que no estaban enlazadas antes. Es divertido, una forma de juego.


Como bien dijo Granda, en España tambien somos creativos en el uso del lenguaje, y la RAE es quien se encarga de reconocer en el diccionario nuevos significados de algunas palabras y aceptar las que se imponen en el comun uso del lenguaje, lo cual no quiere decir que se acepte cualquier barbarismo que se pueda decir.

Art dijo:
Quote:
Pues, no es solamente los americanos que juegan con palabras, también he oído a asturianos usando "talibanes" en un sentido peyorativo y irónico.


Si que es cierto, aunque no es lo mismo el lenguaje hablado que el escrito, y ya hemos debatido aqui sobre eso, en el lenguaje hablado, interviene tambien el "lenguaje corporal", uno apoya lo que dice con gestos y expresiones, puedes llamar a otro "taliban", en respuesta a algun comentario suyo, pero al hacerlo, acompañarlo con una sonrisa o con un gesto de desprecio, el significado de la palabra variará según la expresión del que habla. No tenemos esa posibilidad en el lenguaje escrito, por mucho que nos podamos apoyar en los "emoticonos".

En cualquier caso, solo trataba de expresar mi sorpresa, porque nunca se me habria ocurrido mezclar los dos conceptos, me da igual, puedes llamar a los franquistas como te de la gana, no seré yo quien salga en su defensa.

Siguiendo con el tema de este hilo, precisamente la gramática era una asignatura muy importante, ademàs, se exigìa a los alumnos que se expresasen en castellano correcto, nada de asturiano, yo solo recuerdo a una de mis tias, y poca gente mas, que opinaban que porqué teniamos que renunciar a una de nuestras señas de identidad, los güelos y ella hablaban un asturiano como el que oí en el documental de Luis Argeo, el resto se plegó a aquella exigencia, hablar en asturiano era signo de incultura y nadie queria ser consideraqdo como "paleto".

A esta foto, le tengo mucho cariño, puesto que en ella aparece mi padre, debe de ser del curso de 1923

_________________
"Comienza tu día con una sonrisa, verás lo divertido que es ir por ahí desentonando con todo el mundo."
Mi amiguita Libertad ________
Back to top  
Bob
Moderator


Joined: 24 Feb 2003
Posts: 1707
Location: Connecticut and Massachusetts

PostPosted: Sat Mar 01, 2008 5:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mafalda,

What a wonderful photos. Which one is your father?

The little boy in the front row, fifth from the right, looks exactly like I did in my childhood photos. And the fifth from the left looks very much like my brother, Rick. Do you have any idea who the children are?
Back to top  
Art
Site Admin


Joined: 17 Feb 2003
Posts: 4430
Location: Maryland

PostPosted: Sun Mar 02, 2008 4:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mafalda wrote:
... me da igual, puedes llamar a los franquistas como te de la gana, no seré yo quien salga en su defensa.

Ja, ja. ¡Por supuesto! (Y gracias, también.)

Mafalda wrote:
... yo solo recuerdo a una de mis tias, y poca gente mas, que opinaban que porqué teníamos que renunciar a una de nuestras señas de identidad, los güelos y ella hablaban un asturiano como el que oí en el documental de Luis Argeo, el resto se plegó a aquella exigencia, hablar en asturiano era signo de incultura y nadie queria ser considerado como "paleto".

¿Es tu tía un modelo de conducta para ti? Parece que es o fue una mujer que piensa por si mismo. ¡Ya me encanta!

-----------------------------

Mafalda wrote:
[trans. Art] ... it's all the same to me, you can call Franco's supporters whatever you please. It won't be me who will come to their defense.

Ha, ha. Of course! (And thanks, too.)

Mafalda wrote:
... I only remember one of my aunts, and very few others people, who questioned why we should renounce one of the key elements of our identity. My grandparents and she spoke an Asturiano like that which you can hear in Luis Argeo's documentary. The rest gave in to the pressure [or to the demand that they speak standard Castilian instead of Asturian]. To speak in Asturian was a sign of lack of culture and nobody wanted to be considered a "hick."


Is your aunt a role model for you? She seems like she is or was a woman who thinks for herself. I like her already!
Back to top  
Art
Site Admin


Joined: 17 Feb 2003
Posts: 4430
Location: Maryland

PostPosted: Sun Mar 02, 2008 4:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hmm. Those kids in the photo don't seem happy. Was attending school a miserable experience?

Bob, you picked the cutest kids there! (I'm teasing.)

-------------

Umm. Esos niños no parecen ser felices. ¿Era un sufrimiento la experiencia de asistir la escuela?

¡Bob, escogiste los niños más monos en la foto! (Estoy tomando el pelo.)
Back to top  
Mafalda



Joined: 04 Nov 2005
Posts: 257
Location: España

PostPosted: Sun Mar 02, 2008 6:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Umm. Esos niños no parecen ser felices. ¿Era un sufrimiento la experiencia de asistir la escuela?
Hmm. Those kids in the photo don't seem happy. Was attending school a miserable experience?


¡¡¡No, por Dios!!!, estos niños eran felices, no conozco a nadie que reniegue de la Escuela de Arnao, alli pasamos los mejores años de nuestra vida, y tanto mis mayores como la gente de mi generación recordamos la Escuela y a nuestros Maestros con gran cariño.

Recordarás que la Escuela està situada en un paraje precioso, las aulas son amplias y con mucha luz, los patios disponen de mucho espacio para los juegos, y estaban dotados para la enseñanza al aire libre, incluso habia un tendejón para los dias de mal tiempo.

Los elementos del patio se restauraban y pintaban todos los años en el verano. Las mesas estaban adaptadas a las distintas alturas de los niños que las iban a ocupar, las del primer año eran mesitas de madera para cuatro, pintadas de colores alegres, los colores del parchìs, con una sillita de cada color.

La Escuela, disponia de agua corriente y calefacción desde su inauguración, ¡y estamos hablando de 1913!, no una estufa en un aula pequeñita, sino calefacción de carbón con grandes radiadores en todas las aulas

En el monte anexo, se plantaron árboles y gran variedad de plantas, para la enseñanza de las ciencias naturales. La dotación, sobretodo en los primeros años de su historia, era comparable a la del mejor colegio de este pais.

Los maestros eran gente amable y cariñosa, maestros por vocación y muy cultos, el refrán "la letra con sangre entra" nunca fue aplicable a la Escuela de Arnao.

Bob:
Se que en alguna parte he visto esta foto con casi todos los niños identificados, seguramente en la exposición de la AA.VV de Sta. Mª del Mar. Yo solo reconozco a mi padre y a Lupina, él en la 3ª fila, el cuarto por la izquierda, ella en la 2º fila, 2ª por la derecha. Puedo asegurarte, eso si, que casi todos estos niños tenian parientes emigrados a América, incluso algunos asistieron y emigraron despues, (Oliva, Margarita, Pepe...)
Asi es que no os extrañe si encontrais algún parecido.
_________________
"Comienza tu día con una sonrisa, verás lo divertido que es ir por ahí desentonando con todo el mundo."
Mi amiguita Libertad ________
Back to top  
Art
Site Admin


Joined: 17 Feb 2003
Posts: 4430
Location: Maryland

PostPosted: Mon Mar 03, 2008 4:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mafalda wrote:
reconozco a mi padre y a Lupina, él en la 3ª fila, el cuarto por la izquierda, ella en la 2º fila, 2ª por la derecha.

Tengo una pregunta tonta. ¿Qué quiere decir "el cuarto por la izquierda"? ¿Es él el cuarto niño, si empiezo contar por el lado izquierdo de la foto?

En la foto de mi clase de primer grado, somos todos sonriendo. Tal vez sea una diferencia en las culturas. Recuerdo mi sorpresa en ver que en las fotos de una boda familiar, la pareja no sonrió. Fueron muy serios. Aquí hay una norma social en que hay que sonreír (especialmente en fotos de una boda). Si no, no es una foto buena o una ocasión triste. Un tontería, sí, pero está mantenido como el undécimo mandamiento.

-----------------------

Mafalda wrote:
[trans. Art] I recognize my father and Lupina. He's in the third row, the fourth from the left [?]; she's in the second row, the second from the right [?].


I have a stupid question. What does "el cuarto por la izquierda" mean? Does it mean the fourth boy, if I begin counting from the left side of the photo?

In the photo of my first grade class, we are all smiling. Perhaps it is a difference in the cultures. I remember my surprise in seeing that in the photos of a family wedding, the couple did not smile. Here, there is a social norm in which we are supposed to smile in photos (especially in photos of weddings). If not, it's not a good photo or it's a sad event. Yes, that's silly, but is maintained like the eleventh commandment.
Back to top  
Bob
Moderator


Joined: 24 Feb 2003
Posts: 1707
Location: Connecticut and Massachusetts

PostPosted: Mon Mar 03, 2008 5:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I read it as the fourth from the left, so if I am wrong, I would very much appreciate the correction.

I can think of at least two reasons for the serious expressions of the faces of the children. One is that the are facing into the sun, which makes smiling rather difficult. The second is a cultural phenomenon. My grandfather smiled and laughed a ghreat deal, until confornted with a camera. Then he always posed very seriously, as if a smiling phtograph would misrepresent him to future generationws. Of course he grew up at a time when photos were rare, formal and expensive, and the school photo Mafalda poisted is not much later than his young adulthood (1923)..
Back to top  
Mafalda



Joined: 04 Nov 2005
Posts: 257
Location: España

PostPosted: Mon Mar 03, 2008 7:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

JA, JA Laughing , lo siento, tendria que haber puesto el 4º por la izquierda, y si, asi es, 3ª fila, 1,2,3 y el 4º, no tiene perdida, es el mas guapo de todos Laughing

¡Quien sabe como pudieron hacer que 110 niños de 5 y 6 años se sentaran ordenadamente en la escalinata de la Escuela y posaran formalitos para la foto!.

Para muchos de ellos, seguramente era su primera foto, la primera vez que veian a un fotografo, yo les veo, mas que serios, expectantes, curiosos, ¿no os parece que miran todos al mismo punto?.

Pondré otra foto, esta mas reciente, quizas 1943


_________________
"Comienza tu día con una sonrisa, verás lo divertido que es ir por ahí desentonando con todo el mundo."
Mi amiguita Libertad ________
Back to top  
Art
Site Admin


Joined: 17 Feb 2003
Posts: 4430
Location: Maryland

PostPosted: Mon Mar 03, 2008 9:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sí, los alumnos de la segunda foto son mucho más felices. Tal vez tengas razón que sacar una foto fuera intimidante dado que era la primer encuentro con fotografía para muchos de ellos.

------------------------

Yes, the students seem much happier in the second photo. You may be right that taking a photograph may have been intimidating given that it was the first time many had had their photo taken.
Back to top  
yael



Joined: 24 Apr 2008
Posts: 6
Location: oviedo

PostPosted: Tue Apr 29, 2008 9:45 am    Post subject: de vuelta a las escuelas de Arnao Reply with quote

Recientemente se han estado restaurando las instalaciones exteriores de las escuelas de Arnao. Ahora el edificio tiene otros usos, pero supongo que se pueda acceder al mismo.
Back to top  
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Asturian-American Migration Forum Index -> Our Photo Album - Nuestro álbum de fotos All times are GMT - 4 Hours
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3  Next
Page 2 of 3

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum

Site design & hosting by

Zoller Wagner Digital Design