FAQFAQ          SearchSearch          MemberlistMemberlist          UsergroupsUsergroups    RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile          Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages          Log inLog in          
Spanish Revolution 2011 - Democracia Real Ya
Goto page 1, 2, 3, 4  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Asturian-American Migration Forum Index -> The Future of Asturias - El futuro de Asturias
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Art
Site Admin


Joined: 17 Feb 2003
Posts: 4471
Location: Maryland

PostPosted: Fri May 20, 2011 11:49 am    Post subject: Spanish Revolution 2011 - Democracia Real Ya Reply with quote

Thanks to Carlos and other members for alerting me to this development: Spanish Revolution 2011 or [as Vitor explains below] "Democracia Real Ya". (Of course, this is more than an Asturian issue.)

I'll post several articles here to give some background. You can follow it on Twitter here: http://twitter.com/#!/search?q=%23spanishrevolution

It's interesting that the name uses English: Spanish Revolution.
[Update: Victor explains below that this is a creation of the media. In Spanish it's "Democracia Real Ya".]

------------------------------

Gracias a Carlos y otros miembros para darme noticias sobre este asunto: Spanish Revolution 2011 o [como explica Vitor más abajo] "Democracia Real Ya". (Por supuesto, es mucho más que un tema asturiano.)

Voy a pegar unos artículos aquí para explicarlo. Puedes seguirlo por Twitter aquí: http://twitter.com/#!/search?q=%23spanishrevolution

Es interesante que el nombre usa inglés: Spanish Revolution.
[Actualización: Vitor explica más abajo que es una creación de los medios. En Español es "Democracia Real Ya".]


Last edited by Art on Sun May 22, 2011 10:26 am; edited 2 times in total
Back to top  
Art
Site Admin


Joined: 17 Feb 2003
Posts: 4471
Location: Maryland

PostPosted: Fri May 20, 2011 11:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

20 May 2011

Youths defiant at 'Spanish revolution' camp in Madrid
By Sarah Rainsford BBC News, Madrid
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-13466977

[Photo] Protesters at Puerta del Sol, Madrid, May 2011 The crowds deplore Spain's unemployment rate - the highest in the EU


Thousands of Spaniards in central Madrid have vowed to defy a ban on their protest camp and continue their open-air sit-in.

Spain's electoral board has ruled that the gathering cannot continue into the weekend.

It argues the protest could unduly influence voters taking part in local and regional elections across the country on Sunday.

The decision was met with jeers in Puerta del Sol, where thousands gather every evening - and hundreds have been camping out for five nights now.

Dubbed the "Spanish revolution", the protest began with a march through Madrid on Sunday, led by young Spaniards angry at mass unemployment, austerity measures and political corruption.

It turned into a spontaneous sit-in on the square in Sol, which organisers say has now been mirrored in 57 other cities.

Quote:
Our life is practically over, but they are acting for their future. They have everything to gain and nothing to lose”

Alfredo Guerra Unemployed hotel worker


Independent of any trade union or political party, the protesters' ranks have been swollen through campaigns on social networking sites and Twitter.

"Finally the Spanish people are on the street," says Juan Lopez, 30, a camp spokesman. He lost his job six months ago in a round of staff cuts due to the economic crisis.

"Young people are here because they're worried about the future. We can't tolerate it that 43% of the young have no jobs. That should be the first priority of our society," he argues.

Spain's young generation has been hard-hit by the crisis. Most had temporary contracts, making them cheap and easy to fire.

Many highly-qualified graduates are forced to work as low-paid interns for years and a growing number have moved back home to live with their parents.

'Democracy camp'

Increasingly frustrated, they have finally found their voice.

"On Sunday we realised we were not alone," Juan Lopez explains. "Before [the march] we didn't feel we could make a difference. Now we want the politicians to listen to the people, and help change our country."
A demonstrator in Sol square, Madrid, 20 May, 2011 The protesters are not identifying with any particular political party, Spanish media say.

The protesters' demands, pasted up all over Puerta del Sol, are impossible to ignore.

A statue of King Carlos III on horseback has been decorated with declarations. The metro entrance is now a vast citizens' noticeboard. "We are not slaves," one sign says; another instructs: "No alcohol: today the priority is revolution!"

The camp has become more organised by the day, with bright blue tarpaulins strung from statues and lamp posts and tents pitched on the cobblestones. There are sofas, mattresses and - since Wednesday - four chemical toilets, provided by the firm for free.

Behind a table piled high with fruit, biscuits and Turkish delight, is a mountain of milk cartons, canned fish and crisps.

"I brought bread, tomatoes, cheese and chickpeas," says Leticia Moya, 28, an unemployed nursery worker who lives close to the camp and is one of many supporters donating supplies.

"I feel we should all collaborate, however we can. I can't stay sleeping here overnight, but at least I can bring food. I don't have much, but I prefer to spend my money on this, than on going out at the weekend," she says.

Usually filled with mime artists, tourists and shoppers, the plaza in Sol has been transformed into a vast democracy camp.

During the day, curious locals - many of them pensioners - tour the site, joining in on one of dozens of animated debates.

Suggestions box

There are committees for food, cleaning, legal affairs and communication and daily assembly meetings that hear proposals and allow joint decisions to be made.
A placard hangs above protesters in the Plaza Arriaga in Bilbao, 19 May, 2011 The protests have spread to Bilbao in the north and to other cities in Spain

"It's the young who are leading this," says Alfredo Guerra, admiringly, as he listens in on one assembly. A hotel worker, aged 56, he also lost his job in the recession.

"Our life is practically over, but they are acting for their future. They have everything to gain and nothing to lose," he says.

A core group of protesters have been camping out non-stop since Sunday. Others, who have to work or study, sign up for shifts to join them.

A rough attempt by police to dislodge the apparently peaceful demonstration on Sunday night only brought more people out in support.

In one corner, there is a queue to sign a petition that reads: "We want to demonstrate that society is not asleep, and we will fight for what we deserve. We want a society that prioritises people over economic interests."

"We're fed up with politicians governing according to the markets, and not the needs of the citizens," explains Antonio Rodriguez. "They don't represent us - we're asking for change," he says.

Opinion polls show the Socialist government will fare badly in Sunday's elections. But the protesters in Sol are no happier with Spain's right-wing alternative.

There is much talk on the plaza of electoral reform - to prevent power simply switching back and forth between two parties. Many also demand a ban on all candidates implicated in corruption.

Proposals for debate are posted in a suggestions box.

The camp in Sol has been growing every night, even spawning its own internet TV channel - soltv.tv - and dominating the local news coverage. But as it all emerged spontaneously, no-one is quite sure where it will lead.

Later on Friday, the protesters will discuss the electoral board's ban on their action and take a formal decision on their response.

Individually though, they have already vowed to stay put - right in the middle of Madrid.

"For the moment, we're staying here 24 hours a day," says Juan Lopez. "We have to make sure our message is heard."
Back to top  
Art
Site Admin


Joined: 17 Feb 2003
Posts: 4471
Location: Maryland

PostPosted: Fri May 20, 2011 12:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Posted 05/18/2011
Spanish ‘revolution’: Thousands gather in Madrid’s Puerta del Sol Square [VIDEO]
By Elizabeth Flock
Link to article

People take part in a demonstration in Madrid Tuesday, May 17. (Arturo Rodriguez - AP)

Some 10,000 protesters gathered in Madrid’s Puerta del Sol square Wednesday to demand jobs, economic equality, and “real democracy” in the fourth day of protests that mimic the Middle East uprisings.

“La Puerta del Sol in Madrid is now the country’s Tahrir Square, and the Arab Spring has been joined by what is now bracing to become a long European Summer,” writes Pablo Ouziel in Political Affairs.

Spaniards are protesting ahead of the upcoming elections, when they will vote for new municipal councils and regional governments across the country in hopes of replacing policies they’ve largely been unhappy with.

Much of the movement has been coordinated by the youth organization Democracia Real Ya online, which has used the rallying cry: “We're not merchandise in the hands of bankers and politicians!”

Protesters gathered not only in Madrid but also in the cities of Sevilla, Granada and Valencia. Although a large segment of the population did not participate, many demonstrators referred to the protests as a “Spanish Revolution.”

Prime Minister Jose Luis Rodriguez Zapatero's ruling Socialist Party said they were “alarmed” by the protesters, fearing them to be disaffected left-wing supporters who would abandon the party on election day.

Mariano Rajoy, leader of the conservative Popular Party, which is expected to make huge gains in the elections, said he understood the protesters' motives.

Watch a video shot of the of thousands of protesters in Madrid today by “eloyente” for periodismohumano.com:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=ar2nmOQZEjwe
Back to top  
Art
Site Admin


Joined: 17 Feb 2003
Posts: 4471
Location: Maryland

PostPosted: Fri May 20, 2011 12:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

PÚBLICO.ES Madrid / Roma 19/05/2011

La #spanishrevolution se extiende a todo el mundo
Eslabón para artículo

Hay convocadas concentraciones en Italia y sentadas en Londres, París, Berlín, Bruselas y Copenhague. México DF y Buenos Aires preparan acampadas


La #spanishrevolution ha dejado de ser un movimiento sólo de España y ha empezado a traspasar fronteras, sobre todo en Europa

Juan Cobo, portavoz de #acampadasol, ha declarado a Público.es que están sobrepasados por la cantidad de llamadas que están recibiendo de otros países del mundo. "Nos llaman de Colombia, Costa Rica, México, Venezuela, Argentina... Quieren entrevistarnos e informarse del movimiento", ha señalado. Por el momento, les consta que ya se están preparando acampadas en México DF y en Buenos Aires.

En Europa, las convocatorias para concentrarse se han ido multiplicando a lo largo de la mañana y en países como Italia (#italianrevolution), Reino Unido (#ukrevolution), Francia (#frenchrevolution), Alemania (#germanrevolution), Bélgica, Dinamarca y Portugal ya son toda una realidad.

Fuerte apoyo en Italia

Italia ha sido el país que más se ha movilizado. La voz empezó a correr ayer a través de dos grupos en Facebook: Italian Revolution - Democrazia Reale Ora y Democracia Real Ya - Roma, que han conseguido convocar protestas en 13 ciudades, incluidas Roma, Turín, Milán Bolonia o Florencia.

Las concentraciones están siendo organizadas por los estudiantes erasmus pero se han adherido los jóvenes italianos

El movimiento se transmitió también gracias a Twitter con el hashtag #italianrevolution y consiguió llamar la atención del Popolo Viola y del grupo Anonymous italiano.

La iniciativa se divide en dos grupos. Por una parte están los estudiantes erasmus y trabajadores españoles que decidieron movilizarse siguiendo el ejemplo de la Puerta del Sol y por otro, los propios italianos que han adoptado el cartel de Democracia Real Ya y le han colocado en medio la frase "La Italia de nuestro descontento". En cualquier caso, es seguro que ambos grupos se van a juntar en cada una de esas ciudades

Tanto en Twitter como en Facebook se han querdio transmitir las ideas que están inspirando al movimiento 15M y se ha llamado a respetar unas normas para que todas las manifestaciones tengán la máxima credibilidad. Se pide que la gente acuda sin banderas de ningún partido ni de sindicatos y que elaboren "carteles personales, de grupo, lo que se os ocurra que mejor pueda representarnos".

Como sucede en Madrid, se recomienda llevar "cualquier dispositivo con el que nos podamos conectar con las redes sociales de Twitter o Facebook" para "difundir lo que vamos a hacer en todos los medios".

Los organizadores advierten de que "es posible que legalmente no estaremos amparados: no hemos avisado de la sentada aún porque todo esto se ha organizado esta tarde en cuestión de horas. Mañana [por hoy] intentaremos comunicarnos con las autoridades [...] Es importante que este viernes todo se lleve a cabo con el mayor de los respetos".

Por último, recuerdan que no se lleve "ningún tipo de bebida alcoholica. No se trata de un botellón [...] Es importante que la imagen que mostremos al exterior tenga credibilidad".

Londres, París, Copenhague, Amsterdam...

En el resto de países, las concentraciones se realizarán en las respectivas embajadas españolas: en Londres a las 19.30 horas ante la embajada de España; en Francia desde el perfil de Facebook Pour une vrai démocratie, se llama a manifestarse en París a las 20.00 horas también delante de la embajada española. En Alemania se han convocado manifestaciones en Berlín, siempre frente a la embajada española, para esta tarde y mañana, informa Patricia Baelo.

"Se recomienda llevar cualquier dispositivo con el conectarse a Twitter o Facebook" En Dinamarca, la concentración será el próximo sábado 21 a las 18.00 horas en la embajada española en Copenhague; y en Bélgica, tendrá lugar en Bruselas mañana viernes a las 18.30 horas. La convocatoria también está siendo seguida desde Amsterdam, Holanda, con una concentración convocada esta tarde para las 20.00 horas; y en Lisboa, la manifestación tendrá lugar a las 19.00 horas de hoy.


Last edited by Art on Fri May 20, 2011 12:32 pm; edited 2 times in total
Back to top  
Art
Site Admin


Joined: 17 Feb 2003
Posts: 4471
Location: Maryland

PostPosted: Fri May 20, 2011 12:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

España protestas argentina
Enlace para artículo

Viernes 20 de Mayo de 2011
Terra Noticias / Agencia EFE

Casi un centenar de españoles en Argentina apoya las protestas del "Movimiento 15-M"

Cerca de un centenar de españoles residentes en Buenos Aires se manifestaron hoy en la histórica Plaza de Mayo de la capital argentina para sumarse a las protestas del denominado 'Movimiento 15-M' y alzar su voz contra la clase política de su país y exigir una 'democracia real ya'.


Bajo el lema 'Españoles en Buenos Aires presentes en Sol', alrededor de 80 personas, en su mayoría jóvenes, se reunieron hoy en la emblemática plaza porteña para solidarizarse con los miles de manifestantes que desde el lunes pasado acampan en la Puerta del Sol madrileña.

Procedentes de casi toda la geografía española, algunos llevan años viviendo en Argentina, otros están recién llegados, pero todos compartían hoy algo: su indignación por la 'insostenible' situación que a su juicio vive España, y que a la mayoría les llevó a emigrar.

'Indignados en acción', 'No somos mercancía en manos de políticos y banqueros', 'No somos antisistema, el sistema es antinosotros', 'No hay pan para tantos chorizos', rezaban algunos de los carteles que portaron durante la protesta, en la que no cesaron de corear insignias del tipo de 'Lo llaman democracia y no lo es', 'No es la crisis, es el sistema' o 'El pueblo unido jamás será vencido'.

'Estábamos preocupados porque en España no se estaba haciendo nada al respecto, y de pronto en estos días ha surgido este movimiento maravilloso, espontáneo, lleno de vida, de paz, de energía, y entonces hemos dicho que lo poco que podemos hacer desde acá es unirnos, y en un lugar tan emblemático como es la Plaza de Mayo, así que aquí estamos', dijo a Efe Susana Hornos, de 37 años.

'Estamos apoyando a los compañeros que están en Sol y en cada ciudad de España, que están diciendo basta ya de democracia irreal, basta ya', añadió Hornos, que lleva 12 años viviendo a camino entre España y Argentina.

Marta Cambronero, una salmantina de 27 años, que llegó a Buenos Aires hace dos meses, se mostró convencida de que este movimiento 'no va a quedarse ahí, no se va a quedar en el 22 de mayo', día de las elecciones municipales y autonómicas que se celebran en la mayoría de las comunidades españolas.

'Va a seguir adelante, y vamos a estar ahí para cambiar las cosas en el país, de arriba abajo, porque es una cosa que no funciona y está bastante claro', afirmó.

Entre los reclamos que compartieron estuvo la crítica a la recientemente reformada ley electoral, que, en su opinión, ha complicado tanto la posibilidad de votar para los españoles residentes en el exterior, que casi nadie lo ha hecho.

Los manifestantes acordaron continuar el viernes con la protesta frente a la embajada española, donde esperan reunir a más compatriotas para hacer un pequeño acampe.
Back to top  
guillermogarcia08



Joined: 12 May 2011
Posts: 26
Location: España

PostPosted: Fri May 20, 2011 5:22 pm    Post subject: Re: Spanish Revolution 2011 en asturias también hay movidas Reply with quote

En Asturias ya comenzó la movilización en Oviedo, Gijón y desde ayer en Avilés también, la situación es difícil más del 20% de la población en paro, el 40% es la tasa de los jóvenes. Hay una gran corrupción en las clases políticas y privilegiadas, esperemos que esto cambie por supuesto para mejor. Un abrazo desde Piedras-Blancas (Castrillón)
Back to top  
Art
Site Admin


Joined: 17 Feb 2003
Posts: 4471
Location: Maryland

PostPosted: Fri May 20, 2011 11:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

¡Bienvenido, Guillermo! Gracias, también, por el reportaje. Nos interesa muchísimo seguir los sucesos de Asturias. ¡Entonces, mantennos al corriente!

---------------------------

Welcome, Guillermo! Thanks, too, for the reporting. We're very interested in following events in Asturias, so keep us up-to-date on the news!
Back to top  
ayalgueru
Moderator


Joined: 01 Jan 2005
Posts: 108
Location: Hong Kong

PostPosted: Sat May 21, 2011 6:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ummm ... sorry to be the naysayer but this is no people's revolution but yet another attempt by our small but very militant far left to capitalize on the legitimate indignation a certain sense of despair and the good faith of so some good (yet simple minded) people.

Economist Juan Ramon Rallo makes some points on the article below.

http://juanramonrallo.com/17/05/2011/%c2%a1servidumbre-real-ya/


Lack of proposals is not the same as having ones that are bad. No one can criticize us for lack of ideas on how to reform the world but, obviously, they will have to dissaprove those who transmit ideas counterproductive our freedoms and our welfare.

It has spread the myth that the platform 'Real Democracy NOW' was a heterogeneous group of citizens without a clear ideological profile that hit the streets to protest without any specifics to offer. Not true. Just go to their website to meet a series of nearly 40 proposals much more specific than most of those making up the electoral programs of our political parties. So what's all the talk that they do not propose anything? Well, basically, they are an extreme leftist movement to which we must deal with ccare, the more moderate left labeling them citizens seek to excuse well-meaning but naive and right disqualify them as more self-conscious populace prefers nothing to offer instead of entering discussion of ideas and demonstrate their inanity.

And it is curious how a movement that claims not to be "goods in the hands of politicians and bankers to" do everything possible to become such. Will the theme of the platform, away from rejection, is a desideratum, a sigh for what could be but is not. After all, what other conclusion can be drawn from a mass political demands that the new constraints added to the labor market for recruiting more difficult, or that we advocate that leaders rise further taxes have discretion to-read, squander - an even larger portion of our resources, or who advocates the nationalization of banks and that, therefore, the holes being generated on the orders of politicians and their clients are covered, always and without exception, some enslaved taxpayers? Just want to become pawns in a political class which, far from cutting his powers, they are increasing exponentially: more intervention in labor relations, more tax revenue to spend at will and, last but not least, control over banks which, like boxes, would be addressed by their subordinates.

"The real alternative to the depressing situation? Return control to every citizen of your money to spend it or save as you prefer, allow it to sign contracts, business, commercial or civilian deemed appropriate with the appropriate provisions that repute, and delete, really, privileges banking: namely, end the monopoly of central banks, currency choice, removal of deposit insurance funds and strict enforcement, even of the bankruptcy law so that banks are not rescued by the door behind complete or partial nationalization.

It is true that the ideas of 'Real Democracy NOW' do not resist an analysis of more than five seconds, but not be to deny their existence, in fact, so does our political class and most of the self-appointed intellectuals. Not hide their proposals bring them out to to light and explain what are the consequences: higher unemployment, higher taxes, more deficits and more banks (public) to rescue broken. They want to regenerate the policy, but not to increase the low field of freedom of individuals at the expense of state regulation, but to make them finish the pack mules of the ruling caste. Surprise: the new left is nothing left that life


------------
Una vez mas siuento discrepar esto no es una revolucion del pueblo pero un intento burdo (otro mas ) de nuestra sectaria y entranhable extrema izquierda de intentar capitalizar el descontento legitimo de muchas personas (simples ) pero de buena fe

http://juanramonrallo.com/17/05/2011/%c2%a1servidumbre-real-ya/

El economista Juan Ramon Rallo lo explica en un poc de detalle en el artculo inlcuido abajo

¡Servidumbre Real YA!
Publicado el 17 mayo 2011 por Juan Ramón Rallo

Carecer de propuestas no es lo mismo que tener unas que sean pésimas. A nadie se le podrá criticar por falta de ideas acerca de cómo reformar el mundo (de hecho, muy probablemente nos iría mejor a todos si tales reformistas se prodigaran menos), pero, como obvio, sí habrá que censurar a quienes transmitan ideas contraproducentes para nuestras libertades y nuestro bienestar.

Se ha extendido el mito de que la plataforma ‘Democracia Real YA’ era un grupo heterogéneo de ciudadanos sin un perfil ideológico claro que salía a la calle a protestar sin nada específico que ofrecer. No es cierto. Basta con acudir a su página web para encontrarnos con una serie de casi 40 propuestas mucho más concretas que la mayoría de las que integran los programas electorales de nuestros partidos políticos. Entonces, ¿a qué viene el discurso de que no proponen nada? Pues, básicamente, a que son un movimiento de izquierda extrema al que hay que tratar con algodones: la izquierda más moderada pretende disculparlos tachándolos de ciudadanos bienintencionados pero ingenuos y la derecha más acomplejada prefiere descalificarlos como populacho sin nada que ofrecer en lugar de entrar en el debate de las ideas y demostrar su inanidad.

Y es que resulta curioso cómo un movimiento que clama no ser “mercancías en manos de políticos y banqueros” hace todo lo posible para convertirse en tales. Será que el lema de la plataforma, lejos de una repulsa, constituye un desiderátum; un suspiro por lo que podría ser pero no es. Al cabo, ¿qué otra conclusión cabe extraer de una masa que reclama que los políticos añadan nuevas trabas al mercado de trabajo para dificultar más la contratación; o que propugna que los gobernantes nos suban todavía más los impuestos para poder disponer discrecionalmente –léase, despilfarrar– de una porción aun mayor de nuestros recursos; o que defiende la nacionalización de la banca y que, por tanto, los agujeros que ésta genere a las órdenes de los políticos y de sus clientes sean cubiertos, siempre y sin excepción, por unos esclavizados contribuyentes? Justamente quieren convertirnos en títeres de una clase política a la que, lejos de recortarle sus poderes, se los incrementa de manera exponencial: más intervención sobre las relaciones laborales, más recaudación tributaria para gastar a placer y, por si fuera poco, control total sobre unos bancos que, como las cajas, pasarían a estar dirigidos por sus subalternos.

¿La alternativa real a la depresiva situación actual? Devolverle el control a cada ciudadano sobre su dinero para que lo gaste o ahorre en lo que prefiere; permitirle firmar los contratos, laborales, mercantiles o civiles, que considere oportunos con las provisiones que repute adecuadas; y eliminar, de verdad, los privilegios de la banca: a saber, fin del monopolio de los bancos centrales, libertad de elección de moneda, supresión de los fondos de garantía de depósitos y aplicación estrica, sí, de la legislación concursal a los bancos para que no sean rescatados por la puerta de atrás de su nacionalización total o parcial.

Es cierto que las ideas de ‘Democracia Real YA’ no resisten un análisis de más de cinco segundos, pero no por ello habrá que negar su existencia: de hecho, lo mismo sucede con nuestra clase política y con la mayoría de los autodenominados intelectuales. No ocultemos sus propuestas, saquémoslas a la luz y expliquemos cuáles son sus consecuencias: más desempleo, más impuestos, más déficit y más bancos (públicos) quebrados que rescatar. Quieren regenerar la política, pero no para incrementar la exigua esfera de libertad de los individuos a costa de la reglamentación estatal, sino para terminar de convertirlos en las mulas de carga de la casta gobernante. Sorpresa: la nueva izquierda no es otra cosa que la izquierda de toda la vid.
_________________
splish-splash
the cat washes in the river...
spring rain
Isaa Kobayashi (1816)
Back to top  
Vitor



Joined: 22 Jun 2003
Posts: 46
Location: Asturies

PostPosted: Sat May 21, 2011 8:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Siento discrepar, si Democracia Real Ya es un burdo intento de la extrema izquierda de conseguir sabe dios qué también podemos decir que Juan Ramón Rallo es un 'opinador' de un grupo de comunicación convertido en la vanguardia de la extrema derecha española. InterEconomía tiene un extenso currículo en manipular la información de tal forma que case con su visión, peculiar, de la realidad española.
En mi opinión, el movimiento, es bastante más complejo que esos burdos esbozos que nos aportan los analistas políticos habituales aunque, evidentemente, muchos políticos profesionales tratarán de sacarle partido. Pero a los partidos mayoritarios los ha pillado en fuera de juego, el PP cree que es una nueva conspiración socialista y el PSOE lo ve como una tabla de salvación. Lo que se palpa a ras de suelo, en las plazas, es hartazgo de esta pseudodemocracia que nos concedió el Generalísimo y sus herederos, hartazgo de elegir entre un PSOE, que presenta candidaturas trufadas de políticos imputados en casos de corrupción y que aplica los recortes que le dicta Berlín o un PP, que presenta candidaturas trufadas de políticos imputados en casos de corrupción y que aplicará los recortes que dicte Berlín (¿alguién me puede decir qué candidato presenta la CDU al Principado de Asturias?).
Lo dicho, los que estáis fuera de España conocéis la Spanish Revolution gracias a la cobertura de los medios de comunicación que quizás no pueden profundizar en el tema, pero a ras de suelo se ve que ni son sólo jóvenes universitarios, ni son perroflautas, ni gente antisistema, ni parados... es una masa bastante heterogénea social y económicamente y, de momento, va creciendo. Si el Gobierno decide disolver las concentraciones, que hasta ahora han sido pacíficas, esto se puede convertir en una verdadera revolución, menos mal que, Rubalcaba, es de lo poco que se salva intelectualmente hablando de los actuales gobierno y oposición y ha optado por mantener la calma.
Back to top  
Vitor



Joined: 22 Jun 2003
Posts: 46
Location: Asturies

PostPosted: Sat May 21, 2011 8:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Se me olvidaba, mañana habrá una concentración de apoyo a la Spanish Revolution a las 16h (hora local de la Costa Oeste) en la Union Square de San Francisco (California). Invitad a vuestros amigos Wink
Back to top  
Art
Site Admin


Joined: 17 Feb 2003
Posts: 4471
Location: Maryland

PostPosted: Sat May 21, 2011 9:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

¡Gracias a los dos para un debate inteligente!

¿Sabes el URL de su página web?

¿Tienes alguna idea sobre por qué el nombre es inglés? Parece muy raro, casi cursi.

--------------------

Thanks to you both for intelligent discussion!

Do you know the URL of their web page?

Why do you think the name of it is in English? That seems very odd, almost cutesy.
Back to top  
Vitor



Joined: 22 Jun 2003
Posts: 46
Location: Asturies

PostPosted: Sat May 21, 2011 10:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

La web casi oficial del movimiento es http://democraciarealya.es/
Lo de Spanish Revolution creo que se debe a la prensa extranjera.
Back to top  
Art
Site Admin


Joined: 17 Feb 2003
Posts: 4471
Location: Maryland

PostPosted: Sat May 21, 2011 11:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

¿Entonces, en España se llama "Democracia Real Ya!" ?

-------------------------------

So, in Spain is it called "Democracia Real Ya!" ?
Back to top  
Vitor



Joined: 22 Jun 2003
Posts: 46
Location: Asturies

PostPosted: Sat May 21, 2011 12:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Exacto, Art: Democracia Real Ya. A muchos analistas les parece de extrema izquierda, pero es que, como dijo hace años Xuan Bello, "en la España de hoy en día Thomas Jefferson parecería de extrema izquierda".
Back to top  
ayalgueru
Moderator


Joined: 01 Jan 2005
Posts: 108
Location: Hong Kong

PostPosted: Sat May 21, 2011 12:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Vitor , has empleado un argumento "ad hominem" te has limitado a decir que Rallo es un facha porque colabora con el grupo intereconomia , luego has comentado a beneficio de inventario que el grupo intereconomia son unos fachas malvados pero arteramente has ignorando completamente los argumentos de Rallo que no has comentado en absoluto.

Te daras cuenta de que la participacion de Rallo en programas del grupo intereconomia "per se " no invalida ( ni tampoco valida claro ) su argumento subyacente.

Yo que si creo que merece la pena escuchar a que aquellos con los que presuntamente estoy en desacuerdo (como sabria que estoy en desacuerdo sin haberlos escuchado primero) me he tomado la molestia de leer las propuestas de los autodeclarados lideres del movimiento democraciarealya y vistas una por una en su vasta mayoria son coincidentes con las propuestas de los movimientos de la extrema izquierda antisistema o con las de la izquierda unida liderada por el paleocomunista Cayo Lara. Esto es objetivo no una opinion otra cosa es q dichas propuestas te gusten o no pero lo que hay es lo que hay ... sin acritud.
Otra cosa distinta es que la mayoria de la gente que esta en las acampadas no sabe ni lo que hay ni muy bien de que va el tema pero estan cabrados, y van a la feria esta.


Vitor you have used an “ad hominem” argument, you have just said that Rallo is a facist pig since he does appear in some of Intereconomia Broadcasts (Intereconomia is a Spanish conservative network roughly equivalente to FOX news ). You have just plainly ignored all of Rallos underlying arguments. I am sure you will agree that Rallo’s work for Intereconomia does not automatically invalidate (or validate for that matter) Rallos arguments on this case, it is only fair to consider them case by case on its own merits.
I have read the proposals on this democracial real ya website and one by one their proposals are largely coincidental with those of fringe extreme left wing groups or those of the communist led coalition Izquierda Unida, this is an objective observation, another thing is that you may like that political platform (as I certainly do not) but their proposals are what they are and I am someone that likes to call a spade a spade.
Most of the people protesting are not militants true, but they do not understand what they are getting themselves and frankly are being manipulated by cunning political operators.
_________________
splish-splash
the cat washes in the river...
spring rain
Isaa Kobayashi (1816)
Back to top  
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Asturian-American Migration Forum Index -> The Future of Asturias - El futuro de Asturias All times are GMT - 4 Hours
Goto page 1, 2, 3, 4  Next
Page 1 of 4

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum

Site design & hosting by

Zoller Wagner Digital Design