FAQFAQ          SearchSearch          MemberlistMemberlist          UsergroupsUsergroups    RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile          Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages          Log inLog in          
"El mal del filu"

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Asturian-American Migration Forum Index -> Folklore
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Marta Elena Díaz García
Moderator


Joined: 07 Sep 2003
Posts: 359
Location: Molleda. Corvera de Asturias

PostPosted: Fri Apr 22, 2011 4:47 am    Post subject: "El mal del filu" Reply with quote

Hi, friends:

The “mal del filu” (= disease of the thread) was a typical disease that suffered children many years ago not due to bacteria or viruses but to evil eyes……

According to my mother, when a child became ill, lacking in appetite, lethargic, etc it was very probably that the child was “agüeyado” (some person with evil eyes saw him/her). To remove such disease, a woman (usually is a woman…I don’t know why) that knows special techniques, took a thread and measured the child.

Two data were taken: the child, with the open arms, was measured from the middle finger of one hand to the middle finger of the other hand using the thread. The second measure was from the head to the feet, using also the thread.
If the two measures were different, then the child was “agüeyado” and needed to be cleaned.

For doing this, the thread was “passed” around the child nine times; then the thread was cutted into nine pieces and burned, one by one. When the last piece was burned the lady prayed a magic spell: Twisted Evil

El mal del filu te corto, (the disease of the threat I cut you)
el mal del filu te paso (the disease of the threat I pass you)
En el nombre del Padre (in the name of the Father,)
y del Hijo, (and of the Son,)
y del Espíritu Santo. (and the Holy Spirit.)
El qu´el mal de filu t´echó (That who the disease of the thread set on you)
seque como el filu secó (gets dry as the thread dried)
. Evil or Very Mad


The last paragraph is not precisely a prayer, but a curse, the same disease is wished for that with evil eyes.

In Asturias “tener a alguien enfiláu” means to have dislike for a person, to be ill disposed against or to have animosity towards that person. So, I believe that the origin of the phrase may be related with the “mal del filu”. Mr. Green

Marta.
Back to top  
Bob
Moderator


Joined: 24 Feb 2003
Posts: 1724
Location: Connecticut and Massachusetts

PostPosted: Fri Apr 22, 2011 10:53 am    Post subject: mal de filu Reply with quote

A very interesting post, Marta, and one that relates a set of Christian relationships. The measurements of the child are made in the form of a cross, outstretched arms and head to toe measurements intersect in a cruciform shape. The thread is cut into nine pieces, three for each member of the Trinity. The power of the triune God is invoked in the curse/prayer that wishes the same disease on the person who caused it. The wish is that the thread (of life?) dries up and withers.

Is drying up and withering away what is wished for in "tener a alguien enfiláu"?

Bob
Back to top  
Indalecio Fernandez



Joined: 04 Nov 2008
Posts: 167
Location: San Martín de Podes, Gozón, Asturias

PostPosted: Fri Apr 22, 2011 12:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hola, Bob. El rito de quitar el mal de ojo, yo creo que mas bien se encuentra al margen del cristianismo. Son mas bien una adaptación de creencias animistas precristianas, perseguidas y prohibidas por la Iglesia Romana por herejías y brujería. Esta misma Iglesia adaptó a sus rituales lugares, fechas y creencias anteriores a ella. Se construyeron capillas en lugares de culto antiguo cerca de robles o tejos, se utilizaron fechas de solsticios y equinoccios para sus festividades, todo con el fin de conseguir mas adeptos. La cruz, el res, el nueve y otros muchos símbolos, también son anteriores y adoptados por el cristianismo. Tan solo en quedaron pequeños trozos en lugares rurales, en cuentos para niños o en personajes mitológicos, que posiblemente, antes eran los verdaderos dioses adorados, espíritus del bosque, del agua o del fuego.
http://www.telecable.es/personales/mabeca/conjuros/conjuros.htm
http://www.fortunecity.com/greenfield/fatcat/604/mitosas.htm
http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mitolog%C3%ADa_asturiana
http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cosmolog%C3%ADa_n%C3%B3rdica
http://lapomar.es/asturias/tag/mitologia/
http://usuarios.arsystel.com/juanvicente/patarico/patarico1.html
http://www.asturiasnatural.com/mitologia/
http://www.arrakis.es/~joserm/a_maxica/cnueche2.htm
Back to top  
Bob
Moderator


Joined: 24 Feb 2003
Posts: 1724
Location: Connecticut and Massachusetts

PostPosted: Sat Apr 23, 2011 4:44 pm    Post subject: Folklore Reply with quote

Hola Indalecio,

I think your are quite right about the Catholic Church having suppressed Christian and pre-christian practices and beliefs on grounds of heresy and witchcraft, while at the same time incorporating some of them into the Church calendar, feast days and even dogma. Thanks for an informative post.

By the way, my grandmother's family was originally Fernandez from San Martín de Podes. We may be distant relatives.

Bob
Back to top  
Marta Elena Díaz García
Moderator


Joined: 07 Sep 2003
Posts: 359
Location: Molleda. Corvera de Asturias

PostPosted: Mon Apr 25, 2011 4:50 am    Post subject: Meaning... Reply with quote

Hi, Bob:

It is a feeling and it is not easy for me to explain, particularly in English, but I'll try.

The locution means to bear ill will against somebody, to feel hostility or to have a grudge against somebody.

For example, in the relationship between the mother-in-law and the son-in-law: both may “tener enfilau” one to the other Mr. Green . The same for relationships between workmates or neighbors.

In other sense, we also use the word "enfilau" to refer somebody is a bit drunk: "Pepe ta' enfilau" means that Pepe is not fully drunk, but he is tipsy. Very Happy

Marta
Back to top  
Joniwrite1



Joined: 27 Sep 2010
Posts: 67
Location: Lake Tahoe, Nevada

PostPosted: Thu Apr 28, 2011 4:58 am    Post subject: Evil-eye Reply with quote

Hi Marta,

My Wela used to measure me that way when we were sewing, then cross herself. I never knew why. My Mother would roll her eyes and ignore my questions.

Thanks for the information. Interesting how beliefs and traditions crossed the ocean.

Joni
_________________
Joniwrite1
Back to top  
Indalecio Fernandez



Joined: 04 Nov 2008
Posts: 167
Location: San Martín de Podes, Gozón, Asturias

PostPosted: Thu Dec 08, 2011 12:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hola Bob, sí, posiblemente seamos parientes lejanos. Todo es muy complicado, en San Martín de Podes, puede que hubiese mas de una casa con apellidos Fernández. Si lees mis mensajes verás que Fernández Quevedo Heres se quedó en solo Fernández y que todos se emparentaban mezclándose con otros más apellidos. A mi se me hace muy difícil seguir todas esos emparejamientos. De todas maneras, me alegro mucho de pertenecer a esta comunidad que traspasa fronteras y océanos.
Back to top  
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Asturian-American Migration Forum Index -> Folklore All times are GMT - 4 Hours
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum

Site design & hosting by

Zoller Wagner Digital Design